best-practices

Hello hello!

I hope you had a super Christmas/holiday break. I got to do most of the things on my short list a couple of posts ago (didn’t check phone as much, did the dishes, asked my folks about when they first started dating.) Though happy to beat the cold (-27 degrees at one point) and get back to my own space, I was bummed to leave 500 (the card game that nobody outside the midwest knows how to play), pretty snow, and of course, my family.

If you do work that you sincerely miss when you’re away, you have something good on your hands. I’m pumped for this new year. I feel excited, restored and inspired. In a more mature and reasonable way than in the past. I feel lighter.

This morning I spent a long time writing in an empty journal I bought at an estate sale a few weeks ago. It’s my journal of best practices for happiness and success in life and business. I always find new systems and make rules for myself but it’s too much to keep up with on a daily basis. However, the lessons we learn are rich and they’re worth taking the time to record (without the expectation that they’re always followed.) I know if I do these things I am happier, fuller and live with more purpose. One side is personal and the other is business-specific. So far I have 48. It was fun to write ferociously about new lessons and reflections.

I’m telling you this because A) I recommend and B) I want to know if you do anything like this. Do you have a journal for such things? Do you know of other interesting systems for this sort of thing?

*I recommend reading David Finch’s The Journal of Best Practices. It’s one of my favorite books from last year. It’s a memoir about saving his marriage after being diagnosed with Aspergers.


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COMMENTS
  1. Brianna

    I’ve been wanting to start a life guidebook/bible/rulebook of sorts for myself for so long, but can’t decide on a format that I can stick to. Thinking about designing one that can hold everything from ideas & inspirations to grocery lists..all in one :) Interesting to see your take on it!

    Reply
  2. Chad

    Think slow, do the thing you least want to do first and don’t panic until it’s panicking time (and it’s almost never panicking time).

    Reply